NBA

A Warrior’s Path: Steph Curry’s Run To Success

steph curry

The Golden State Warriors completed one of the most successful seasons in NBA history, culminating with a Finals victory in six games. No player on the Warriors had any previous Finals experience, but that was hardly apparent based on how well they all competed. They overcame slow starts in the first quarter of multiple games. They made lineup adjustments, putting MVP Andre Iguodala in the starting lineup to rejuvenate an offensive slump and dial up the defense on LeBron James. They withstood occasional stretches of poor shooting and found ways to win close games. They dealt with outside distractions: hearing how Klay Thompson was not shooting well, or how they would not be able to stop LeBron, or how Matthew Dellavedova’s defense was changing the outlook on the series. (Admittedly, he played very well during the Finals, but the idea that he would completely shut down Curry for an entire series was a ridiculous notion from the start). The Warriors did not play like they were just happy to be in the Finals. They played with energy and determination, embodying the “Strength in Numbers” mantra that adorned their apparel. Now they are the NBA champions, and with most of their core roster intact, will likely contend for a few more.

Most importantly, the Warriors were led this season by a point guard who, although rarely espouses his personal accomplishments, finally saw his own basketball journey come to fruition this season. Stephen Curry burst onto the international scene over the past two seasons, building a well-deserved reputation as one of the best young stars in the NBA. He has also been a hit on social media, although his daughter Riley is likely equally responsible for that. By now everyone has heard his long story: the son of Dell Curry who would tag along to the Charlotte Bobcats arena and shoot a few jumpers with his father; the late bloomer who had to retool his entire shooting stroke when he became strong enough to hoist the ball from above his shoulders; the high school star who was passed over by nearly every major college program and found his way to Davidson, where he would lead them to the Elite 8 during his sophomore year in one of the most memorable runs in NCAA tournament history. Despite this, many scouts and fans still doubted whether Curry would be able to make it in the NBA, especially when compared to other supposedly-superior point guards in his draft class. He was drafted after Jonny Flynn and Hasheem Thabeet. The Timberwolves alone took Flynn and another point guard, Ricky Rubio, while Curry was still on the board. That year he finished behind Tyreke Evans in the Rookie of the Year voting. Then, injuries and ankle surgery hindered his early professional career, leading to widespread concern that lingering ankle problems would prevent him from reaching his potential. In his fourth season he began to emerge as one of the league’s premier shooters, but was overlooked during selections for the All-Star Game.

Look up Curry’s story and you will hear everything about his improbable journey, but there is something else nearly as distinctive: his shot. Most shooters release the basketball at the highest point of their jump, but Curry’s shot looks different. As depicted by “Sport Science” on ESPN, Curry releases his jump-shot earlier, while still ascending in the air. This quicker release can create accurate shots amid tight defense, which has set him apart from other NBA stars. Fans are captivated by his pinpoint accuracy from the left corner and his ability to make shots on a fast break. Any game could be one in which he makes ten from behind the arc or hits from half-court (or really anywhere). He frequently attempts shots that would be dismissed for their degree of difficulty, yet he gives every shot a decent chance at going in, and many of them do. In the NBA, we have grown to expect the plethora of playmakers, big dunkers, and defensive stalwarts, all without argument. Yet it is the skill of shooting that appeals to the nostalgia and purity of the game. A brilliant shooting display can ignite a crowd in the mere second the ball swishes through the net. It gives us buzzer-beaters and memorable moments. Many are willing to work to improve every year, but not everyone can become a master of the craft. Every generation there are one or two players who demand our attention, who simply make us want to watch (and replay) every shot. And right now we are watching one of the best of all time.

Stephen Curry was not a top recruit out of high school. He was never considered a number one draft pick. Not everyone thought he would even succeed in the NBA. Now he is a perennial All-Star and the MVP of the league. He is the best 3-point shooter in the game right now, and perhaps the best of all time. He combines skills in dribbling, passing, and shooting that are individually mastered by many players, but rarely displayed by one superstar night after night. At first embracing the underdog role, he has blossomed into one of the classiest and most exciting players in the NBA. He has already accomplished enough to fill a successful career, and yet it seems like he is just getting started. He is the kid that people thought might not even make it; now he is an NBA champion. Stephen Curry’s career, just like his shot, is on the up.

Featured Image: The Big Lead

“Sports Science” is a TV series owned by ESPN.

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